Homeschooling end of year updates

Zeph – continued withThe Ramayana in more detail and looked at some classical Indian painting using a still from the children’s Ramayan on Youtube to copy a watercolour painting of his favourite scene from the story. Of course he chose the most gruesome aspect of the entire thing.

photo 3-17

He turned eleven and we ate cake by candlelight, he assembled the stunt scooter he wanted and he has been enjoying it ever since.

Image-1

I introduced him to Baraka Blue and he loved the clip “Love and Light’  since we have been to so many of these places in Fes.
We talked about the elements that plants need to grow and about the differences and similarities between the way human beings and plants interact with the elements.

photo 5-2

He started learning about the story of the Buddha’s life and we discussed the Four Noble Truths.

boys homeschool

We discussed the Tree of Life including plant/animal kingdoms and he made his own Tree of Life drawing.

photo 1-6

Then we started making a Family Tree to illustrate how the Tree of Life/Plant and Animal Kingdoms branch out from one another. I showed him the old coffee and burnt edges trick to make a document look old and he loved it. We can trace our family to the Second Fleet on my mother’s side.

He finished reading Demon Dentist.

Tom – learned about gravity and wrote a humorous story about ‘The Day there was no Gravity’. We did some grammar and spelling.
We discussed the basic elements of photosynthesis.
He read from Little House in the Big Woods.

photo 2-2

He read two Native American Creation Stories – Cherokee and Sioux.

A theme of one Creation Story was to not be scared of trying new things, we made a plate with some new (to M) tastes, mostly fermented goodies from my fridge that the children usually turn up their noses at…

photo 2-3

photo 3-2

photo 5-3

We looked through a book I’ve had since childhood, Native American Portraits and began to talk about the impact of  colonisation upon the Indigenous people of North America and Australia.

He started a unit on the Water Cycle and an experiment boiling water to show condensation. And an experiment about evaporation.

Spelling and handwriting practise.

Lili – is six meaning she is at Kindergarten level according to our syllabus. The main thing is to focus on rhythm and play incorporating letter and number forms slowly.

photo 5-17

We have started in the garden. HH was delighted when I gave her a garden bed all of her own and everyone gathered together to help assemble it. She had been asking me for days if she could grow strawberries so this was the first plant I gave her for her garden.

Image-1-2

We read ‘Does my Garden Grow?’ by Gerda Muller. The illustrations are wonderful and the story is very involved, it is more like reading a chapter book and we read a little every day rather than it all in one go.

Our cucumbers seedlings are already at least one centimetre tall, HH was thrilled to see that they had already come up. We read a story about a germinating seed and we talked about how the sun ‘calls’ the seed to sprout through the surface of the earth. She has been watering her own veggie patch every morning and evening so she understands that the ingredients a plant needs to grow are sunlight and water and the nutrients of the soil. We talked about the number four and how there are four seasons and four elements. We read a story about the four seasons. And this afternoon it is raining heavily so the garden will be happily drinking it all in.

Image-1-3

Focused on the letter H and the number 5 so we listened to  ‘Aranjuez‘ and we performed the Dance of the Five Silks to an audience of dolls!

Image-1-5

She dressed as a Queen and we tried lots of different combinations of costumes made from play silks. These are really one of my favourite Waldorf toys, so incredibly simple and versatile and HH loves them.
We then played Hopping on the H. Later she kept dancing while I read to her from Grimm’s Fairy Tales. Generally she loses interest in stories that are without many illustrations but the movement enabled her to stay completely absorbed.


We read Flower Fairies of the Seasons and HH loved that it was a copy I had owned as a child.

Image-1-4

She read the story of Eartha the Earthworm and then we went into the back garden to look for worms. It must have been too hot though as we didn’t find anything. Then we modelled the numbers one to six using modelling wax and played some number games.

numbers

photo 3-6

We sang a physical mandala, ‘Parts of Plants’ to the tune of Head, Shoulders, Knees and Toes, an active way of learning the functions of the roots, stem and leaves….the leaves soak up the sun, soak up the sun.

The strawberries started growing well.

photo 2-7

She made a kite on a very windy day for the letter K.

photo 1-8

We read Sonia’s Chicken’s.

photo 3-8

We continued reading Grimm’s Fairy Tales and her reluctance to sit and listen to non illustrated stories is now a thing of the past, it just took the right stories to captivate her attention.

TogetherHoli Festival

My favourite part was really the Welcome to Country. The elder spoke of the Merri Creek we sat next to being like the blood in our veins and this really struck a cord with me because I feel like the Huon River is my blood and I miss that landscape more than I can describe, I feel it like an ache in my body. I wonder sometimes if the discord in my sense of place related to my becoming a Muslim has really sensitised me to the reality of belonging and where and how we are owned, which atoms resonate with which atoms. Perhaps because I no longer know where I belong in terms of race, my sense of connection to land is heightened. The land does not belong to my cerebral interpretations, it simply exists and is as it is and whether white, Muslim, city dweller or not it is the pulse of my childhood. I do think we are owned by the land we grow up upon. But I wonder how my children can foster a similar sense of place since our connection to the land in suburbia is so fractured.

In the Welcome to Country he spoke about the genocide, about the stolen generation. At least two thirds of the crowd he was speaking to were not listening, already throwing colours upon themselves and laughing and dancing. I found it hard to hold back tears because it just seemed like a metaphor for the greater reality of our situation in Australia in which white people (and I am one of them) have not and will not and do not listen, not properly.

The elder also said we all belong to the land and we are all welcome and it is this humility and generosity that always rips my heart out because we white people are welcomed, we are included, if only we could just start listening as well. He spoke about refugee’s and boat people and Manus Island, he said that Manus Island is the same as the stolen generation.

I know that it isn’t completely the same but I am so, so grateful for my experience of sexism and my awareness of how male privilege works and how difficult it is to get through to some men about it because I can use it to recognise similar dynamics with white privilege and colour blindness. When we grow up white it is very, very difficult to start to understand how racism really works as opposed to what we have been taught racism is. Our understanding of racism is usually around 5% and if we don’t fit that 5% we assume we aren’t racist, we don’t realise that our entire society is built upon structures that are racist. Recognising this is probably the most difficult thing a white person can do and therefore most of us won’t do it.

It was great for Zeph to see the Festival of Colours in action, even if an anglicised version of it, they had lots of fun.

Image-1-8

Made watercolour mandala’s and decorated some of the lemon branches we cut from our tree with some colourful wool for our nature table.

photo-4

photo 2

photo 3

photo 1-3

drawing mandala's

Made our Summer Nature Table

summer nature table

We began learning to knit using Youtube video’s.

We cooked.

photo 4-6

dinner

ceres

Pregnancy wise we had a bit of an upheaval when the lovely non-medicalised bubble I was living in popped and I discovered I have Gestational Diabetes again. Whilst not a big surprise since I have had it before, it is disappointing because it probably means I cannot birth at home as planned. I am grateful for at least spending 30 weeks in such a blissful, non intrusive space, an entirely different experience than my other pregnancies during which I was connected to the hospital system from Day 1.

Whilst I had planned to continue homeschooling through the Summer holiday break right up until my due date, the next few weeks I will now be busy with appointments so I think we will take a break from doing anything structured and just enjoy preparing the house for the baby.

 

 

 

 

October 2015

We are gradually beginning to find our feet and I am starting to feel more excited than daunted. I know I have really just dipped my toes into Steiner education but even just these humble beginnings fill me with an enthusiasm that I find hard to articulate. I am loving it and whilst our days are far from perfect, I am finishing the week with a sense of achievement.

I have two boys who don’t want to write. At all.

Two boys who have no interest in presenting their work beautifully.

I realise this is fairly standard for young boys particularly those who have been in the education system but it’s something I find frustrating since my personality is the complete opposite and as a child I loved making projects look beautiful, presentation was really important to me.

Getting my boys to write is a real challenge but at least with this method the writing is also part of an overall creative package, every day involves colour and drawings.
Whenever I manage to encourage them to do some writing I feel like I’ve hit the jackpot!

Image-1-4

Zeph  – wrote a story, the real story was far more realised and imaginative than the story that made it to script. H does not want to elaborate or use descriptive language if it means needing to transcribe it into letters. But the simple fact of something making it to paper is encouraging. I don’t correct their work in their books but make a note of spelling mistakes and we go over those words later. I have purchased some basic cursive workbooks so we can work on handwriting.

We are still working through the unit on Ancient Indian civilisation. Today we talked about some key concepts in Hinduism comparing them to our Islamic perspectives on the same thing. With our study of comparative religion I really want to emphasize the similarities between faiths but sometimes the differences are also food for conversation. Zeph was really interested in the caste system and we watched a short Youtube documentary about the Untouchables/Dalits.

Tom – We made flat bread yesterday for Tom’s lesson, we have just finished a unit on the Ancient Hebrews and now we have moved on to the Phoenicians. Because the children are half Lebanese I explained that the Phoenician civilisation was actually in what is now Lebanon.

Image-1-2

We are still reading aloud from Little House in the Big Woods. I think there is far too much benefit in the Little House books to leave them because of the colonialist attitudes. Instead I’m going to approach those things as they come up and use them as reasons to discuss racism and indigenous issues comparing the North American situation to our own reality in Australia.

Lili  – really loved it when we made bread, it struck me just how perfect these activities are for her age group. Initially we were working from the Gr 1 curriculum because I wasn’t sure how things matched to an Australian Prep but we have moved back to the Kindergarten book and it’s a much better fit. She doesn’t enjoy the stories in the Oak Meadow fairy tales book though so I am trying to find other stories to read to her. Today we read about a Fairy called Faith who couldn’t sleep for the letter F and we did some watercolour painting. HH knows most of her letters already but I think the slow, rhythmical pace of the syllabus is really important. When she wants to she brings me the ‘Teach your child to read in 100 easy lessons’ book and we do a lesson but I am not forcing it. We are also working together to make the work for her main workbook and I have another book that is entirely for free range drawing because I was finding that she won’t follow the guidelines for the lesson otherwise.

Image-1-3

She also spent time playing in the garden and we skipped to the end of her book and found the Spring science lessons since season wise we are upside down. We read a story about a germinating seed and next week hopefully we will plant some things ourselves.

Image-1-5

I have ordered the rest of the curriculum and art/craft materials I need and now it’s just a matter of waiting for them to arrive. And when working with Lili today I made a small painting for our Spring Nature Table which hopefully I will have finished before Summer 😉

photo 1-13